Do you love organizing? If you already have great organization skills and love to keep a clean and tidy home, why not turn your skills into a profitable business? I was SO inspired to read about Jen and how you can make money with a professional organizing business. There is also an online course you can take to become a professional organizer that I can’t wait to sign up for! How to become a professional organizer.

How To Become a Professional Organizer

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I’m so excited to bring you this guest post from Jen Obermeier from Pro Organizer Studio about how to become a professional organizer! Do you love organizing and picture yourself as the next Marie Kondo? Find out more about what it takes to become an organizing expert, a typical professional organizer salary, how to be successful as an organizing professional, and much more! Enjoy!

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How do you become a Professional Organizer

Professional organizing is becoming an increasingly popular career choice. In fact, the industry is rapidly expanding, so if you’re naturally organizationally inclined, there’s never been a better time to begin exploring career options.

If you’re interested in taking your knack and love for all things organization to the next level and learning how to become a professional organizer, Jen Obermeier from Pro Organizer Studio, a resource for professional organizers who are looking to start and grow a professional organizing business for themselves, is talking all about what it takes to become a professional organizer and business owner.

How Jen became a Professional Organizer and made her first $2,029

Jen Obermeier is the founder of Pro Organizer Studio and the creator of the Inspired Organizer® program. She launched her business back in 2014 when the notion of a professional organizer was still in its relative infancy.

Jen is a naturally organized, detail-oriented person who used her talents and abilities in all her previous career roles. She realized that her skills and talents were highly sought after and that busy professionals NEEDED someone to help them get their life on track and start living with more purpose, efficiency, and happiness.

At the time, Jen didn’t even own a computer, however, she felt compelled to launch a pro organizing business. She commandeered her friend’s office for a weekend and came out with a website, brand, and a drive to start helping people live a better, more organized life.

Soon after, she landed her first client through a Facebook Ad. She walked away from that first consultation with a check for $2,029 in her hand. This was the point that she knew that she was onto something and that her life was about to change in the best way possible.

Jen realized that she had stumbled upon something that many people never find: her purpose. She figured out how to turn her skills into real money, all by doing something that she loved and felt a deep passion for.

Today, she helps other savvy women do the same. She encourages women to find that spark and turn their love for organization into a real, profitable business that they can be proud of.

Related reading: 20 Flexible stay-at-home mom jobs that make a good income

How to Get Started as a Professional Organizer

Being an organized person is almost like having a special superpower — not everyone has it! There are so many people out there that would gladly pay you to transform their home, office, and life simply because it’s an area that they’re struggling with.

If you’re exceptionally organized but you’ve never taken the time to realize that your skills are not the norm, listen up because you can turn your skills into a profitable business.

Before you get started with a pro organizing business of your own, it’s important that you understand the job. Clients are looking for more than just someone to tidy up their space; they’re looking for a coach, therapist, cheerleader, and sometimes a shoulder to cry on.

A professional organizer has the power to impact people on multiple levels, so it’s important that you bring the total package to your clients and really understand what they need.

The first step is to research everything you can about the profession and know that if you possess organizing skills, you’re already legitimate!  But every step you take toward building your knowledge and understanding will help push you further into your career.

Becoming a pro organizer might be your dream job, but you won’t be successful if you don’t put in the work.

Related reading: An easy way to make $500 fast – how to declutter and where to sell your stuff

5 steps to start your career as a Professional Organizer

1. Decide if you want to get certified and become a CPO (Certified Professional Organizer). This is NOT necessary, however, it does help you gain legitimacy, experience, and trust in your market. You can get your CPO certification from NAPO (National Association of Productivity and Organizing).

2. Attend professional organizing conferences and consider investing in a coach or mentor.

3. Create a marketing plan. This should include designing a brand, building a website, determining if you want to specialize in a specific area, pinpointing your ideal clients, getting your social media accounts going, and determining where you should be focusing your marketing efforts.

4. Start building your portfolio by offering your services to friends and family in exchange for testimonials and before and after pictures.

5. Use your marketing tactics to target and land your dream clients!

Professional Organizer Salary

Once you’ve made the decision that you’re ready to turn your love for organizing into a career, or even a side hustle, your next question might be “how much does a professional organizer make?”

As a professional organizer, you can expect to make anywhere from $50 to $200/hour or more. Yes, that’s a wide range, but there are a number of factors that will determine how much you’ll be able to earn.

Factors that determine the salary of a professional organizer include:

Experience

The more experience you have, typically the higher the rate you’re able to charge.

Location

The location of your business will affect the amount you’re able to charge. Factors like your geographical location and city vs. rural service areas will play a role in your pricing.

Time of year

Springtime is by far the most popular time for clients to seek the help of a pro organizer, so you may be busier during this time and able to charge a premium for your service.

Educational background and certification

You may find that you’re able to charge more for your services when you have the CPO attached to your name. Clients are more likely to shell out top dollar for professionals who have the credentials to back it up.

Type of clients you target

There’s a misconception that only the wealthy can afford your service, however, people of all income levels are interested and willing to pay for your work. For those with lower incomes, you may offer a-la-carte services that are more budget-friendly.

Specialization

If you have an area of expertise, you can usually charge a premium for that service. For example, if you’re a wizard in the kitchen or have a special certification for organization design, you can up your prices to reflect your expertise.

How Many Hours Do Organizing Professionals Work?

As a professional organizer, the number of hours you’ll work will depend on many factors, including your client load and the scope of their projects. Most projects take anywhere from 2-10 hours to complete and your hours may be broken up into several sessions.

As a professional organizer, the number of hours you’ll work will depend on many factors, including your client load and the scope of their projects. Most projects take anywhere from 2-10 hours to complete and your hours may be broken up into several sessions.

As a professional organizer, the number of hours you’ll work will depend on many factors, including your client load and the scope of their projects. Most projects take anywhere from 2-10 hours to complete and your hours may be broken up into several sessions.

For example, you may break your sessions up into several that include a consultation and a few sessions of work. You’ll also have to consider things like time spent shopping for supplies, planning, and the time spent doing the work.

Related reading:

How to Be Successful As a Professional Organizer

Being a successful professional organizer is so much more than just being great at organizing, although that’s obviously important. It’s about loving people and having a true desire to help them transform their lives from the inside out.

If you’re someone who’d rather sit behind a desk than be out in the field, this may not be a great career for you. Likewise, if you find yourself judging the organizationally challenged, you won’t succeed either.

You need to have a certain level of compassion, intimacy, and confidentiality that your clients can trust. You have to make true connections to your clients and show them that you’re there for THEM. You’re a teacher, a counselor, and an expert that they can fully rely on to help them reach their goals without any judgment.

The other thing that you must have in order to be successful as a professional organizer is a drive to succeed. As with any business you start, it’s going to take a lot of time, work, and dedication. There will be blood, sweat, and maybe even some tears in the process — but your ability to succeed will hinge on your unwillingness to give up.

There are people out there who NEED your service, it’s your job to serve your offer up in a tidy, compelling package and market yourself as the industry expert that you are. Before you know it, you’ll have dream clients ready and waiting to work with you.

Advice for New Professional Organizers Starting Their First Business

If you’re serious about turning your skillset into a profitable business that brings much more than just clean, tidy spaces to your clients, then you’ve got to invest in yourself. Take inventory of your traits and skills and compare them to the ones needed to run a successful professional organizing business — what areas could you improve upon? What areas do you excel in?

One of the best investments you can make in yourself and your budding business is the investment in personal or group coaching, training, conferences, and seminars. Check out NAPO for courses, certifications, and other materials that will help bolster your career.

And check out Jen’s Inspired Organizer program, your road map for designing a marketing program that sets you apart from the crowd and allows you to continuously drive sales to your business. This program is packed with everything you need to know to get your brand out in front of the people who are waiting to be introduced to your EXACT services.

Suchot’s note: Thanks Jen for your insights on what it takes to become a professional organizer. I myself am more the type to need a professional organizer than become one (!!), so I’m happy you could step in today and share these tips on professional organizing. I know lots of readers would LOVE this as a dream job.

If this is YOUR dream job, you can take this course: Introduction to Professional Organizing. You will learn how to start a career as a Professional Organizer, Home Organizer, or Clutter Coach.

And since nobody wants to live in a tidy but dirty home, check out 17 Homemade cleaners that people actually swear by.

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Do you love organizing? If you already have great organization skills and love to keep a clean and tidy home, why not turn your skills into a profitable business? I was SO inspired to read about Jen and how you can make money with a professional organizing business. There is also an online course you can take to become a professional organizer that I can’t wait to sign up for! How to become a professional organizer.

Thanks Jen for sharing your tips on how to become a professional organizer!


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4 thoughts on “How To Become a Professional Organizer”

  1. I’d never heard of a professional organizer before – but I can certainly see the need for one. I am often amazed at how disorganized people are – both in their homes and at work. I’ve always been very tidy and minimalistic (even before it became fashionable!) and it makes so much sense to me to life in an ordered space.

    1. I think the need for professional organizers is just going to increase. The more stuff people have, the more it needs to be organized. Whenever my husband says we need more shelves/this storage thing/etc. I always say we just need less stuff!

  2. Mandy

    Perhaps when I finally convince my husband to clean out his parts of our house (the armoire with tee shirts that have probably composted by now, the closet stuffed with clothing in waist sizes he hasn’t worn since Bill Clinton was in office, our garage AKA The Museum of Ancient Power Tools) I’ll consider myself fully qualified to turn pro.

    1. “…probably composted by now…” 😂😂😂 So funny!! You’re on your way to qualified right there…

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